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Friday, January 22, 2010

Personal Blog Textbook: Brainworks (p8) Q24(b) A mathematician proposed that "Every even number greater than 2 can be expressed as a sum of two prime

The first 500 prime numbers:

Question:
A mathematician proposed that "Every even number greater than 2 can be expressed as a sum of two prime numbers." Do you agree? Why?

I agree with the mathematician as:

4 is equal to 2+2
6 is equal to 3+3
8 is equal to 5+3
10 is equal to 5+5
12 is equal to 7+5
14 is equal to 7+7
16 is equal to 13+3
18 is equal to 13+5
20 is equal to 17+3
22 is equal to 17+5
24 is equal to 19+5
26 is equal to 19+7
28 is equal to 23+5
30 is equal to 23+7
32 is equal to 29+3
34 is equal to 29+5
36 is equal to 31+5
38 is equal to 31+7
40 is equal to 37+3
42 is equal to 37+5
44 is equal to 41+3
46 is equal to 41+5
48 is equal to 43+5
50 is equal to 43+7
52 is equal to 47+5
54 is equal to 47+7
56 is equal to 53+3
58 is equal to 53+5
60 is equal to 53+7
62 is equal to 59+3
64 is equal to 59+5
66 is equal to 61+5
68 is equal to 61+7
70 is equal to 67+3
72 is equal to 67+5
74 is equal to 71+3
76 is equal to 71+5
78 is equal to 73+5
80 is equal to 73+7
82 is equal to 79+3
84 is equal to 79+5
86 is equal to 83+3
88 is equal to 83+5
90 is equal to 83+7
92 is equal to 89+3
94 is equal to 89+5
96 is equal to 89+7
98 is equal to 19+79
100 is equal to 97+3
102 is equal to 97+5

These are the first 50 even numbers after 2 and they all are sums of 2 prime numbers. One reason that this statement made by the mathematician is possible is that when 2 primes
(odd numbers except the first prime number(2)) are added together, they form an even number that is always greater than 2.

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